Old habits die hard. It’s much easier to continue doing what we’ve always done even when we clearly see the good in making a change. We must be intentional about cutting a new groove to finally rest in the change we seek to make.

Water takes the path of least resistance. And once a path is formed it will continue flowing in this same direction until a new groove is cut.

And our old habits function in a similar way.

For instance, we might want to change our current diet and exercise routine, practice love in a way our wife can receive, or redeem our inner critic.

And in each of these cases we can clearly see the changes we want to make and we make a good faith effort toward them.

But life happens and eventually we find ourselves back to our old habits once again.

It’s not that we’re lazy or don’t care about the changes. It’s just that we have to commit to the hard work of cutting a new groove when everything in us is trying to flow back into the path of least resistance.

Change does not come easily and this is where practice and discipline comes in. We must commit to practicing the disciplines of the change we seek to make in order for the new habits to form.

And this means we can’t wait on the change to be spontaneous regardless of how much we want things to be different.

We must show up and do the work to eat better and exercise, to love deeply, and to consistently filter the stories we tell ourselves through the light of truth even when we don’t feel like it.

It’s pressing through this resistance that allows us to cut a new groove and eventually rest in a new way of being.

In the end, change is possible. But it requires intentional and consistent effort.

Press through the resistance and cut a new groove that allows for more goodness and beauty to flow through your life and relationships.

Photo by Karsten Winegeart on Unsplash

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