We all want to be seen, affirmed, and blessed for who we are and for what we can offer to others. In short, we want to be admired for the glory God has given us to reveal. And while certainly it’s easy for this desire to become overextended and prideful, this doesn’t make the desire itself a bad thing.

For instance, even as little kids we enjoyed being able to Wow others by our very presence and the gifts we offered.

And as we became talented in particular areas, we loved the admiration that came when others witnessed and were blessed by our excellence.

For example, of course, a singer-songwriter feels good when his songs resonate and inspire others and he receives the sincere gratitude of his listeners.

A teacher also loves the admiration received from his students – affirming his ability to penetrate ignorance and make a meaningful difference in the lives of others.

This might also be a desire as we build, work, and create many other meaningful projects and services for others.

It’s true we’re not doing these things primarily for the recognition that might come. All the same, there’s still a part of us that longs for others to see and bless the glory God has given us to reveal.

This becomes prideful when we make it all about us – when we want others to essentially worship us as if we were God.

But it becomes false humility when we downplay our glory and assume we have nothing admirable to offer.

At its best, the desire for admiration is simply the desire for our God-given glory to be fully seen, affirmed, and blessed.

When we don’t acknowledge and bring this desire out into the light, it often grows dark and comes out in sinful ways.

In the end, God has given you a glory to be admired. Receive all the blessings that come from this while remaining humbly grateful to reflect God’s divine image in the world.

Photo by Pro Church Media on Unsplash

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